How to make business fun and financially successful

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One woman’s mission to bring joy back into business for growth on every level

Hot housed by her father, an inspiring CEO, to become fluent in benevolent business principles, organizational cultures and economic intelligence, Laleh Hancock has always felt at home talking spreadsheets, implementing growth strategies and managing staff.
Today — a transformational business coach with more than 25 years of experience building companies and coaching individuals that win — Laleh is passionate about taking the grind out ofbusiness and making it fun, enjoyable and full of ease for her clients, mumpreneurs and Fortune 500 companies alike.

“What if business didn’t have to be difficult?” Laleh asks. “What if it could be easy? What if the things you don’t enjoy about your job, position or business could be looked at and experienced from a fresh perspective that would make it more enjoyable AND more profitable?”

The truth, according to Laleh, is that it can. Some of her top tips include:

1. Do business in a way that promotes positivity and growth
Revenue is one measure of growth, but so is number of employees, staff-development and happiness metrics. To create a growth promoting environment for your business, direct positive energy and intent at the employee’s experience, the client’s experience and the revenue stream as well. Creating a culture and system that promotes all three will create great energy and support your business to grow exponentially.

2. Create environment that allows employees to thrive
Approximately 90% of people leave a job because of the relationship they have with their supervisor — usually they don’t feel engaged, valued or that their voice matters. Include employees from all levels (not just management) in strategic updates, idea generation and brainstorming sessions. Ask them what they know, what they are aware of and what ideas they have to help create a better future, so they feel valued and can buy in to the business.

3. Recruit the wrong way for the right people
People often hire based on experience and if a potential employee doesn’t match the job description, they’re not willing to hire. Sometimes, people have skill, ability and capacity for a role but haven’t had to perform in that way before. Talented employees can be missed because they didn’t have the right experience on paper. Instead, look for a curious mind, a willingness to look at things differently each day and an ability to handle change (in a changing world).

4. Your staff are the source of revenue, not just an expense.
A new employee brings fresh ideas and new business to your organization. Give up your view of seeing them as an expense and replace it with excitement, invigoration and revenue generation. Welcome them in as an asset by relating to them this way from the get go. The time to hire new staff is the second you feel overwhelm. Ask yourself: If I don’t hire more people, and everyone is overworked, what is that going to create?  If I do hire, what else will be possible that we can’t do today?

5. Growing beyond your niche
Most businesses define themselves by one thing they are really good at, which is limiting to the business and hampers its potential for growth. Ask yourself: how can you add to your existing business strengths? What else is possible that has not yet been explored? If it’s a service, can you add products? If it’s a product, can you add a service? Having multiple income arms promotes growth and diversity is protective as well.

6. Looking at futuristic models and possibilities
Put yourself in your business five years from now and feel into what it will need. Being able to continuously look at where your business is now and how it might have to operate later is powerful. Will you need new hiring systems, accounting systems, cyber security systems, new ways to engage with clients?  Create a map of where your industry is going and keep up, so you’re not left behind.

“My favorite part about my work as a business consultant is I get to see the joy in people when they realize it does not have to be a fight anymore and how to make the shift. Business, when done well, is a creative and collaborative environment that allows people to connect, use their skills and thrive.”

Laleh Hancock is a transformational facilitator and business coach with more than 25 years of experience building companies and individuals that win. Whether partnering with a Fortune 500 company or an entrepreneurial stay home mum, Laleh is dedicated to empowering people and organizations of all ages and stages to grow and expand. Laleh is a certified Facilitator for Access Consciousness, including Joy of Business, a specialty program of Access Consciousness. She meets people where they are and provides practical tools to empower people to create more joy, ease and possibilities in life. Laleh served on the Governor’s Maryland Caregivers Support Coordinating Council for four years. Follow on Twitter at @Belapemo.

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